Monday, October 20, 2014

The World Music of Strunz & Farah



All Photos:  Alan Mercer



Strunz & Farah’s music is perhaps best described as original multi-cultural acoustic instrumental improvisational guitar music, or world jazz. Their music emphasizes and luxuriates in sensuous melody and rhythm with a colorful and passionate expression, and is saturated with their cultural roots. Afro-Caribbean, Latin American folk, flamenco and Middle Eastern music all converge in an essentially jazz context, especially in the sense of improvisation, and is a unique contribution to the diversity of contemporary guitar music.


Renowned world, jazz, popular, and classical artists they have recorded collectively or individually with include Stanley Clarke, Sting, Hubert Laws, Dr. L. Subramaniam, Hayadeh, Gerardo Nuñez, Manoochehr Sadeghi, Jihad Racy, Edwin Colón Zayas, Liona Boyd, and Ashish Khan. They have also recorded with Joan Baez, and have recorded with and performed often with Jackson Browne.


Strunz & Farah are the innovators of an entirely new expression for the acoustic guitar. Well ahead of their time they created an original style that now is widely influential. They have each brought the musical influences of their native lands into their highly virtuosic, rhythmic, and improvisation-rich original instrumental compositions, inspiring fans and many guitarists worldwide. Their meeting in 1979 in Los Angeles, where they are still based, marked the first time that Latin American and Middle Eastern music, along with other important elements, came together on the guitar. They remain the undisputed masters of the style they created.


Jorge Strunz was born in Costa Rica. Given his first (three-quarter size) guitar at age 6, he grew up also in Colombia, Mexico, Spain, England, Canada, and the United States, studying and playing flamenco and classical guitar. He performed flamenco guitar professionally as a teenager, accompanying Spanish dancers and singers. He later also played electric guitar in numerous rock bands. He then turned to jazz and jazz fusion, and then focused on his own Latin American roots, Caribbean and Latin folk music. Strunz developed an original, lyrical style, and a way of playing guitar that is his own synthesis of hand techniques from flamenco, Latin folk and classical guitar combined with state-of-the art virtuoso linear plectrum playing. In 1994 and in 1998, Strunz received two Presidential awards from the government of Costa Rica for his cultural contributions.


Ardeshir Farah was born in Tehran, Iran. While still a teenager, he moved to England for schooling. He played guitar since childhood, focusing on popular music and improvisation. He has performed and recorded extensively with many of the top expatriate Persian singers and musicians in the US who fled Iran after the Revolution. Farah was the first to use Middle Eastern inflections in a contemporary guitar setting. His distinctive touch has a unique exoticism.


They prepared a repertoire, began performing, and recorded their first project, Mosaico in 1980.  Although record companies at that time were not ready for this new music, Los Angeles jazz radio embraced it and world/jazz industry pioneer Richard Bock got the duo signed to the prestigious jazz label Milestone for whom they recorded their revolutionary albums ‘Frontera’ in 1983 and ‘Guitarras’ 1984. These records defined world music on guitar years before the “world music” category existed.


Since 1980, they have made 20 albums, 15 of which are studio recordings, including their very popular titles Primal Magic (1990), which topped the Billboard World Music charts, and the Grammy-nominated Américas (1992), and Heat of the Sun (1994; top 10 Billboard World Music chart).  Their latest recording is Moods and Visions (April 2014), celebrating 35 years of highly successful collaboration, continuing and evolving the duo’s original synthesis of multi-cultural elements into a flowing, melodic and rhythmic acoustic guitar style of the highest virtuosity.


In their performances and recordings, which have sold about a million and a half, one can savor the fruits of one of the most unique yet enduring and harmonious musical collaborations in the world of the guitar.





AM:  Did either of you envision lifelong music careers when you were children?


Strunz:  I did.  Definitely, I wanted to be a musician ever since I can remember.  I decided I wanted to be a musician by the time I was fourteen.


AM:  So you never wanted anything else?


Strunz:   I went to school and studied other things, but it was to please family.  Both of us did.  I went to Georgetown University for five years.  Ardeshir graduated with a degree in architecture from USC, but we were always musicians the whole time. 


Farah:  That part of the story is very similar for the both of us.  I also loved playing music from a very early age, but from the part of the world that I’m from, it was about do your studying first and then you can play your guitar.  I come from a family that has seven architects and Engineers. 


AM:  So that’s why you studied architecture.  Did you enjoy it?


Farah:  In some ways, yes.  My family is all into buildings.  I used to practice guitar three hours a night when I went to USC.  Then I would look at my school books for twenty minutes. 


AM:  Can you talk about your background?


Strunz:  My dad was a foreign services officer so he was a diplomat so we did travel around a lot and lived in a lot of different places.  I did get to go to a lot of schools and live in different countries.  I had an enriching childhood, certainly rich in different cultures.  It can also be a bit confusing but I sorted that out later. 


AM:  You speak English with no discernible accent.


Strunz:  My native language is Spanish but my father spoke English to me and my mother only spoke to me in Spanish so the kids in the family all grew up perfectly bilingual.
 

Farah:  My mother’s two brothers both married Germans.  My stepfather is American.  My mother’s sister’s husband is also American.  From childhood we always spoke English and German.  We did a lot of traveling to Europe.  Iran is so close that it’s very common for Iranians to drive through Turkey, Greece and France.


AM:  I love a worldly upbringing! (laughter from all)   Which reminds me that you are considered the leaders in the category of World Music. 


Strunz:  That may a bit of a stretch, but there were some people involved in doing collaborations with international musicians at the time that Ardeshir and I got together, but it was very few.   There were bands like Weather Report who had international groupings.  We weren’t the first but we were in the vanguard.  We were the first to use third word culture exclusively and melding it with international and American influences. 


Farah:  World music became a category in 1987.  That’s when Billboard magazine coined the name. 


AM:  Was that a plus for you to have a category?


Stunz:  It helped a lot because we would fall through the cracks all the time. 


Farah:  In this country everything is categorized.  You have to be rock or jazz or something.


AM:  Do you relate to jazz music?


Strunz:  Very much so.  I was very much into John Coltrane in the late 60’s while I was living in New York City.  Later on I was into Miles Davis.  I liked the playing of Pat Martino and spent a lot of time studying him.  I definitely have a love for certain types of jazz.


AM:  When you were developing your sense of style did you realize it would be so unique?


Farah:  We were very unique.  We just followed our instincts and drew from our backgrounds and influences.  We created the music that came to us naturally.  We were not trying to fit into any particular category.  I would say we are very unique.


AM:  I love how you get the credit for it as well.


Farah:  In the beginning it was hard because record companies thought we were too unique.


Strunz:  They weren’t sure what our music was.


AM:  So then you started your own record label.


Strunz:  We did. 


AM:  Was it natural for you to be business men?


Strunz:  No it wasn’t.  It was a hat we had to learn how to wear.  My wife helped out a lot with that.  She is our third team member in a sense.  We had to learn how to manufacture records.  This is back in 1980.


AM:  Did downloading change anything for you?


Strunz:  Well, illegal downloading has made a difference for all musicians.  We’re an endangered species.  There are only 30,000 musicians globally who earn a living from playing music.  It’s hurting music a great deal and we are affected. 


AM:  Is there any style of music that you haven’t recorded yet that you want too?


Strunz:  Our style is already a conglomerate of styles and we specialize in it.  We don’t want to specialize in other styles of music so much.  We love flamenco for example, and sometime people call us flamenco, but we go out of our way to tell them no.  We do not play flamenco.  It’s an influence but that’s all.


Farah:  It’s a completely different style of guitar music.  What they do is completely different. 


AM:  Is there a spiritual aspect to your music?


Strunz:  All music has a spiritual component to it.  I say spiritual and do not mean religion.  Music comes from the spirit.  It deals with feelings and emotions that can’t really be put into language.

   
Farah:  It certainly has a spiritual element to it.  It also has a strong political statement.  We have the coming together of different cultures and brotherhood. 


Strunz:  These kinds of collaborations tend to be global collaborations.


AM:  You have unity of all mankind.


Strunz:  We are all in the same boat and we have to deal with global issues together. 


Farah:  We are fortunate to live in Los Angeles which is a very cosmopolitan city.  



To learn more about Strunz & Farah visit their web site http://www.strunzandfarah.com/

Monday, October 6, 2014

May Pang Designs Jewelry


All Photos:  Alan Mercer   Lighting:  Eric V.



May Pang worked for ABKCO, the Beatles’ management company, in the early 1970’s, and from there was hired as John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s personal assistant.  After her relationship with John Lennon ended, May worked for Island Records and United Artists.


May was born in Manhattan. She is the daughter of Chinese immigrants and grew up in New York's Spanish Harlem with an elder sister and an adopted brother, both of whom were born in China. 


After graduating from Saint Michael Academy, May attended New York City Community College. She wanted to be a model, but was told she was too "ethnic" by the modeling agencies.  May's early jobs included being a song-plugger, which meant encouraging artists to record them.  In 1970, she began work in New York as a receptionist at ABKCO Records, Allen Klein's management office, which at that time represented Apple Records and three former Beatles: John Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.


May was asked to help Lennon and Ono with their avant-garde film projects, ‘Up Your Legs Forever’ and ‘Fly,’ in December 1970. May was then asked to be Lennon and Ono's secretary and factotum/gofer in New York and England, which led to a permanent position as their personal assistant when the Lennons moved from London to New York in 1971. May coordinated an art exhibition in Syracuse, New York, on October 9, 1971, for Ono's ‘This Is Not Here’ art show at the Everson Museum.  Yoko  Ono's show coincided with Lennon's 31st birthday.


In summer 1973, May was working on the recording of Lennon's ‘Mind Games’ album.  Lennon and Ono were having marital problems and decided to separate, and Ono suggested to Pang that she become Lennon's companion.  Ono explained that she and Lennon were not getting along, had been arguing and were growing apart, and said that Lennon would start seeing other women. She pointed out that Lennon had said he found Pang sexually attractive. May replied that she could never start a relationship with John as he was her employer and married. Ono ignored May's protests and said that she would arrange everything.  Ono later confirmed this conversation in an interview.  In October 1973, John Lennon and May Pang left New York for Los Angeles to promote ‘Mind Games,’ and decided to stay for a while, living at the homes of friends.


In March 1974, Lennon began producing Harry Nilsson's ‘Pussy Cats’ album.  May rented a beach house in Santa Monica, for her, Lennon, Harry Nilsson, Ringo Starr and Keith Moon to live in. At this time, May encouraged Lennon to reach out to family and friends. He and Paul McCartney mended fences and played together for the first and only time after the breakup of The Beatles.  May also arranged for Julian Lennon to visit his father for the first time in four years.


Julian began to see his father more regularly. Lennon bought Julian a Gibson Les Paul guitar and a drum machine for Christmas in 1973, and encouraged Julian's interest in music by showing him some chords. "Dad and I got on a great deal better then," recalls Julian. "We had a lot of fun, laughed a lot and had a great time in general when he was with May Pang. My memories of that time with Dad and May are very clear—they were the happiest time I can remember with them."


In June 1974, Lennon and Pang returned to live in New York City. Lennon stopped drinking and concentrated on recording.  While visiting Mick Jagger in Montauk, New York, John and May saw a Scottish-style cottage for sale close to the Montauk Point Lighthouse. Lennon asked a real estate broker to put in an offer for it in February 1975.  Lennon and Pang were also planning on visiting Paul and Linda McCartney in New Orleans in February 1975, where Wings were recording the ‘Venus and Mars’ album, but Lennon reconciled with Ono the day before the planned visit, after Ono said she had a new cure for Lennon's smoking habit.


After Lennon returned to Ono, May Pang started working for United Artists Records and Island Records as a PR manager, working on albums by Bob Marley and Robert Palmer.
May published her memoir, ‘Loving John,’ in 1983. It was later updated and renamed ‘John Lennon: The Lost Weekend.’ The original 500-page ‘Loving John’ book focused mainly on Pang's role on Lennon's albums and sessions.  It was edited down to 300 pages, concentrating mostly on the sensational aspects of their relationship. It also included postcards that Lennon had written to Pang during his travels throughout the world in the late '70s.’ May claims that she and Lennon remained lovers until 1977, and stayed in contact until his death.


May's book of photographs, ‘Instamatic Karma,’ was published in 2008. Besides the candid personal portraits, the book contains some historically important photographs, such as Lennon signing the official dissolution of The Beatles' partnership, and the last known photograph of Lennon and Paul McCartney together. Cynthia Lennon also provided a back cover endorsement, acknowledging May Pang's role in reuniting Lennon with his estranged first son, Julian.


May Pang married record producer Tony Visconti in 1989, but the couple divorced in 2000.  They had two children, Sebastian and Lara. She remains in touch with some of the people from her time with Lennon, and Paul McCartney invited her to Linda McCartney's memorial service.  She was an invited guest at The Concert for George in 2002 and remains close to Cynthia Lennon and Lennon's first son, Julian Lennon.



May Pang lives with her children in upstate New York and produces a line of stainless steel Feng Shui jewelry.  She volunteers with an animal shelter called Animal Haven in New York and owns a dog rescued after Hurricane Katrina.  She also co-hosts an Internet talk radio show, "Dinner Specials with Cynthia and May Pang", at blogtalkradio.com, with on-air partner Cynthia Neilson.




AM:  May, what is an average day like for you?


MP:  I’ve only recently started coming out and doing events and autograph shows.  Right now I like to design jewelry. 


AM:  How did you get interested in designing jewelry?


MP:  My mother, who was a little old lady from China, passed away a few years ago at the age of 97, liked to make jewelry.  I took all her supplies and started making my own jewelry as a way to honor her.  She had an amazing eye for these things.  I inherited her vintage Swarovski beads.  I am updating all her work to fit into the 2000’s.  I’m sure she can see it all from heaven.   I’m also working on some limited edition photos from my book, ‘Instamatic Karma.’ 


AM:  You really are a photographer aren’t you?


MP: Yeah, I loved it as a hobby and John loved it.  He loved the eye I had for him.


AM:  Did you intentionally take publicity photos of him?


MP:  I never thought when I was taking photos of him that they would be published.  There are a few photographs in the book that he absolutely loved.  He used one for a 45 single release sleeve.  The kids today don’t know what those are.  One of my photos was used as a sleeve for ‘Imagine,’ even though it had come out earlier in the United States, it hadn’t come out as a single in England so they used it over there. 


AM:  Do you still enjoy the attention you get from that time period?


MP:  I’m enjoying all of it.  I have an Internet Radio Show and I would love to do more.  In the past I even did some acting. 




AM:  I sure didn’t know that.


MP:  I’m actually a SAG and AFTRA Actor.  I’m in the Mike Nichols film, ‘Heartburn.’  I ran into Mike Nichols at a restaurant a few years later and I told him how much I loved all his films and then told him I was in ‘Heart Burn’ and he told me that was a good movie to be in.  So we said good-bye and he walked out of the restaurant.  A few moments later he came back in and said, “I remember you in the party scene.”  I said, “That’s right.”  He told me he never forgets a face. 


AM:  Do people still associate you with John Lennon?


MP:  Oh absolutely! 


AM:  That must be like a tattoo on your face.


MP:  It is a tattoo.  A lot of people don’t realize that John’s biggest solo work came from the time we were together.  I was with him when he was working with Harry Nilsson and Ringo Starr.  I got him and Paul McCartney back together again and got him reconnected with his son Julian.  To this day I am very close with Julian and his mother, Cynthia. 


AM:  Were you star struck when you first met?


MP:  I worked in their office and the first thing I thought about was being 13 and in love with the Beatles, but after you work in the office for a while, it starts to change and it becomes a job.


AM:  Did you enjoy the job?


MP:  Yes, but just like any other job, if you don’t do it well, you are out.  A lot of people think it was Yoko who set up the whole job and that she pulled the plug when it was over but it wasn’t that way.  She suggested that John and I get together and I told her I didn’t want him. I had been with him for three years already.


AM:  What was Yoko trying to do?


MP:  She was pushing him on me because she was trying to date somebody else.  John and I had a good employer/employee relationship.  It was never Yoko who called.  It was John who did the calling.  He pursued me.  That’s the only reason we ended up together.  It wasn’t because of Yoko.  Also when it ended it was a surprise to John.  We were just about to buy a house.


AM:  Was that rough on you at the time?


MP: Absolutely!  It was devastating.  I learned it was the same way for John.  Even though he was back at the house with Yoko, he was still calling me.  He just wanted to make sure I was alright.  If anyone knew John, they knew he was not the type of person to do that.  Once you were gone that was it, but that’s not how it was with us.


AM:  Was John Lennon a love of your life?


MP:  Looking back I feel love for each person I was involved with, but John was the first person I ever lived with.  He definitely made an impression.  Even though we were not together in the last five years, he stayed in touch with me.  Not many people realize that.  He called me a lot.  Our relationship really did not end, even though there was a forced ending to it.  He would still call me.  He even called me from South Africa the year he died, just to talk.  




To learn more about May Pang visit her web site http://www.maypang.com/

Sunday, September 28, 2014

The Inner Reaches of Gino Vannelli


All Photos:  Alan Mercer



Born in Montreal, Quebec, Gino Vannelli is one of three sons, including Joe and Ross, born to Russ and Delia Vannelli. Russ, his father, was a big band musician. As a child, Gino's greatest passion was music, and he began playing percussion at an early age. By the age of 15, Gino began writing songs. Just out of high school, he signed his first recording contract with RCA under the pseudonym Vann Elli, but went on to study music at McGill University.


After a stint in New York City, Gino and his brothers went to Los Angeles in a financially distraught and desperate state to wait outside trumpeter Herb Alpert's locked gate for an audition. Alpert was Vannelli's last hope prior to heading back to Montreal the next day. Alpert liked what he heard and two days later signed Vannelli with A&M Records, releasing his first album, ‘Crazy Life’ in 1973. Gino's brother, Joe, served as arranger and keyboardist for most of his recording career. At a time when polyphonic synthesizers were non-existent, Joe overdubbed multiple parts to create a texture of sound that was progressive for the early 1970’s.


In 1974, "People Gotta Move" made it to No. 22 on the Billboard Top 100.  On February 15, 1975, Gino Vannelli became the second Caucasian performer to appear on Soul Train.  This was his television debut. With his records climbing the charts, Gino toured as the opening act for Stevie Wonder. In 1978, the song "I Just Wanna Stop" earned Gino an American Grammy Award nomination and was a number No. 1 single in Canada and #4 in United States.  Gino's album ‘Brother to Brother’ was certified platinum in early 1979. Gino won Canada's Juno Award for Best Male Artist. He also won Juno Awards in 1976 and 1979. His additional recordings of the 1970s include: "Crazy Life," "Powerful People," "Storm at Sunup," "The Gist of the Gemini," and "A Pauper in Paradise".


In April 1981, "Living Inside Myself" was on Billboard's Top 100 at number 6. The Vannelli brothers shared the Juno Award for Recording Engineer of the Year in 1986 for ‘Black Cars.’ The Juno Award for Recording Engineer of the Year was again shared by the Vannelli brothers in 1987 for ‘Wild Horses’ and ‘Young Lover.’  Gino's additional recordings of the 1980s era include ‘Nightwalker’ and ‘Big Dreamers Never Sleep.’ During this time, he married Patricia, with whom he would have a son, Anton.


In 1990, the album ‘Inconsolable Man’ delivered new releases by Gino Vannelli to excellent reviews. In 1991, the Vannelli brothers shared the Juno Award once again, for ‘The Time of Day’ and ‘Sunset on L.A.,’ both from the ‘Inconsolable Man’ CD.  On Gino's next CD release, ‘Yonder Tree,’ he pays homage to his roots in jazz, apparent on his earlier albums.  ‘On Yonder Tree,’ Gino sings a musical tribute to the renowned poet, author and humanitarian Walt Whitman, in ‘Walter Whitman, Where Are You?




The latest recordings released by Gino Vannelli are ‘Canto’ and ‘These Are the Days.’ He surprised the music world by revealing his operatic license in ‘Canto,’ which heralds his superlative vocals in Italian, French, Spanish and English.  Gino was commissioned by the Vatican to perform for Pope John Paul II. On the ‘Canto’ recording is a loving tribute to Gino's father titled, ‘Parole Per Mio Padre,’ which was also a favorite of Pope John Paul II.  Gino Vannelli's electrifying vocals and music garnered rave reviews for ‘Canto.’


Gino Vannelli lives and works in Amersfoort, Netherlands and in the United States.  His music is also heard on popular European television and radio commercials. When not in concert, Gino is actively working on various projects and teaching Master classes.


In March 2007, Gino performed in Las Vegas to sold-out shows.  By request, encore performances were given two months later at the Flamingo Showroom.  In November 2007, Gino  gave three sold out performances in New Orleans, Louisiana. The concerts were a humanitarian effort with proceeds benefiting local charities. By popular demand, Gino Vannelli continues to tour globally.



On May 13, 2014, Gino Vannelli's the "Live in LA" CD/DVD compilation was released by the Sono Recording Group.  The presentation was recorded live onstage at the historic Saban Theater in Los Angeles, California on November 8, 2013, which represented Gino’s first performance in Los Angeles in more than 15 years.  The recording also marks the first on-stage collaboration in many years between the three Vannelli brothers.




AM:  Gino, what a GREAT show you did in Dallas!


GV:  Oh thanks, it was really fun.


AM:  How do you keep spiritually centered while traveling around the world?


GV:  To me spirituality is communing with the part of you that is not typically a common place, known to you on an everyday basis.


AM:  Is it a feeling you have?


GV:   It’s a sense, but not a sixth sense, because it’s relegated to this plane.  It’s something called potential and you commune with that potential.


AM:  Can you give me an example?


GV: It’s like an empty canvas and that canvas can be anything.  The spiritual act can be in the form of a prayer.  You can humble yourself and get on your knees.  Physically speaking when you do get on your knees you are praying.  You can pray to a cloud, or a star or the moon or the sun.  It really is simple.  The truth is what you are really doing is communing with the inner reaches of yourself.




AM:  I believe the same way.


GV:  When you tap into that, you find the power, the direction, the patience, the faith and the determination, to get where you want to get.  Anybody who is being truthful in any way, whether it be an artist, a contractor, an architect, a painter or whatever, they know how to commune with that part of themselves that brings the best out in themselves, in their own way.  Some may consider it spiritual and others may even consider it barbaric or crass, but they do it.


AM:  It seems one needs a high intelligence just to understand the simplicity.


GV:   That’s because the simplicity is in ‘how you do it.’  There is no simplicity in the inner reaches of space.  Given a blank canvas, most people wouldn’t know where to start.  The simplicity is saying this is what I will do and I will do it every day.  This is all Eastern philosophy.


AM:  Those lessons have been around forever.


GV:   There is a reason why that tradition has been passed down for centuries.  It’s all about repeat, repeat, repeat.  There are beats to it.  They say, “May I be healthy in mind and body.’ Then another beat, then repeat, “May I be healthy in mind and body.”  The act of repetition is like the juggler who is practicing and saying ,”I’ll get it next time.” The act of repetition makes it sink in a little bit deeper each time.  This simple act of repetition will create the reality you are looking for.


AM:  That is brilliant.  Do you meditate?


GV:  Everyone does some form of meditation.  When I’m out playing with my puppies, that is a form of meditation because we commune.  I anticipate what they will do next and they anticipate what I will do next and then when we finish playing I hold them in my arms and we just look at each other.  They are also children of the great mind.  What can you say about joy?


AM:  How do you keep the dark side of the music business from affecting you?


GV:  You don’t open the floodgates and say this is daunting.  You know it’s going to be a long, tough haul so you look at it in steps.  Lau Tzu wrote this book 2500 years ago that is a small companion book of Chinese philosophy.  It’s very prophetic.




AM:  Yes, I am familiar with Lau Tzu.


GV:  He says to think of the small as big and the big as small.  So I look at big tasks as small baby steps.  Step one would be to have my piano tuned and ready to go and then what songs I want to perform.  It’s a step by step approach.  When you look at things that way, you tend to want to do them.  You don’t want to open up iTunes and see ten thousand new albums, what chance do I have?  Don’t look at it that way.  So I forget the other people and I ask myself what do I have that’s worth hearing.  


AM:  Are you singing your favorite songs in concert these days?


GV:  I do have favorites but you can’t get them all in one show.  I have over 200 songs. 


AM:  I really like your ‘Canto’ album.


GV:  It’s a nice album.  I’m very proud of it. 


AM:  Are you touring around the world right now?




GV:  I am constantly on tour.  I make sure we don’t over tour.  We don’t want any boredom or dullness in the audience or the musicians.  It’s always a bit of a honeymoon when you don’t see each other for two or three weeks and then you do a show and it’s nice to be with everyone again.   October is a busy month.


AM:  So you are still working and have no intention of retiring anytime soon. 


GV:  No not for a few more years.  I’m working on another record.  Hopefully it will be ready in the next six months.  I spend a lot of time writing poetry.  I want to write a poetry book.  I have a lot on my mind as far as that’s concerned.  I’ve always been a fan of poetry and I try to turn them into songs.  Most of the ‘A Good Thing’ album was poetry turned into songs. 


AM:  You are certainly a deep thinker.


GV:  Well I am a man who is in the last part of his days and I know everything is inside us.  It’s not out in the eithers.  We get the ball rolling with what we think we are.  Those who are hopeful in a positive way tend to do better because they draw that energy to themselves.


AM:  I agree with that!


GV:  My son is a deep thinker too.  He has a degree in philosophy.   He asked me what was the difference between karma and a random act?  I told him some things are random because the wind can blow and you get a brick in the head, but if you react in a certain way, you will create a pattern.  If you react in another way, the pattern will be stopped and it will just be a random event.   The artists who survive create a pattern of who they think they are.  It ends up being a little bit of a spiritual quest because you start with what is not known and you create a reality from it.



To learn more about Gino Vannelli visit his web site http://www.ginov.com/


Sunday, September 14, 2014

Eric Himan: Modern Troubadour


All Photos:  Alan Mercer   Assisted by Eric V. and Psymon Imagery



Eric Himan is an award-winning nationally touring soulful/folk/rock artist based in the Tulsa area. Eric's music has recently been featured on Sirius/XM's Coffeehouse radio station with his song, "Everything To You" and version of the Simply Red classic, "Holding Back the Years". Eric has shared the stage with Leon Russell, India.Arie, Edwin McCain, Karmin, and many more. Recently Eric and band performed at the Center of the Universe Festival with OneRepublic, OK GO, and Neon Trees. He has appeared in the The Advocate, Huffington Post, OUT, newspapers nationwide, won the Singer/Songwriter Awards in London and is endorsed by Fender Guitars.


Eric has come a long way in the years since his humble beginning entertaining crowds in colleges near his alma mater, Penn State University, but his love affair with the nomadic life began much earlier when he plucked his first guitar string or struck a chord. While Eric lives by the motto "Don't ask me where I'm from, ask me where I'm going," his past has much to do with the life he now pursues with great fervor. Growing up with a father in the military, Eric constantly relocated, shuffling through cities and states without enough time to put down serious roots. It wasn't until he attended Penn State University that he picked up a guitar and became a coffee shop crooner.



Eric released his debut CD and founded his own independent label, Thumbcrown Records. He quickly gained a "cult" following and broke from the idea of being a small-town act, for his unique sound that transgressed genres as he penned songs that dabbled in Blues, Folk, Pop, Blue Grass, Country, and Rock all served up with a pinch of wit and charm. His shows are not about theatrics and superstardom, instead, his shows are intimate and fans can't help but feel as though their best friend is onstage. Eric forges personal relationships with many of his fans with his disarming charm and approachability.




AM:  Eric I know you recently opened a string of shows for Leon Russell.  What was that like?


EH:  Leon is amazing!  I got that gig because of my drummer Brandon, who has been with Leon for seven years.  Brandon played on the Elton John Tour.  So anyway he told Leon about me and played my latest album, ‘Gracefully’ for him.


AM:  I love that album!


EH:  Oh thank you.  So I started opening up for Leon last summer.  It was a lot of fun.


AM:  How did it compare being an opening act and doing your own headlining?


EH:  When you are an opening act you are at the mercy of the headliners schedule.  I’m going on tour with Ani DeFranco next.  As an opening act it’s about you, but it’s not about you.  The majority of the audience is there to see the headliner.  If it’s my show, I don’t have to win anyone over like I do when it’s an audience who isn’t there to see me.


AM:  Do you perform a different show as an opener?


EH:  Yes I do. 


AM:  You have a lot of different styles of music in your own compositions.


EH:  Yes, that is on purpose because I like a lot of different styles of music.  


AM:  What do you think of Country music?


EH:  I’m fans of the people who are actually writing the songs. 




AM:  What was it like working with Patty Griffin?


EH:  It was amazing. 


AM:  Did you ever see Robert Plant?


EH:  No he wasn’t around but her audience would ask if Robert was there while she was performing.  He is Rock Music Royalty.  Not many people make it to that realm.  People want to know that that presence is amongst them.


AM:  What was it like meeting Patty Griffin?


EH:  I met her after the show with her little dog.  She made it a point to come up to me and tell me how much she enjoyed my show.  I was petting the dog and thinking to myself, “This is Robert Plant’s dog.”


AM:  I love how you are a fan of music too.


EH:  Oh God, YES!


AM:  You relate to your fans like that too right?


EH:  Ani DeFranco is my idol.  I hate to say I have one person at the top of the pyramid of many artists because I love many different artists for different reasons, but I’m not going to lie.  She made such an impact on me as an artist. 


AM:  In what way?


EH: Lyrically for one.  She focused my attention on things that I write about more in my own music and my guitar playing.


AM:  Are you writing music for your next album?


EH:  Yes I’m constantly writing.  Brandon and Matt are writing with me for a trio project that is more in the Rock music vein.  The songs are a little more musically complex.  I’m working with the best musicians I have ever worked with in my career.


AM:  You seem to stay busy and have a steady flow of work.


EH:    I always have a steady flow because I do all my business myself.  I know I’m the only one in my way.  There’s a pressure to that but also an opportunity.  I can work as much as I want to or as little as I want to. 


AM:  You work a lot.


EH:  I work a lot because I can’t afford not to work a lot.  I’ve been blessed with lots of opportunities. 


AM:  I like the way you pump out music.


EH:  I do pump out music but I want to be consistent in a sound.


AM:  Eric you are also known for being a gay rights activist.  Are you a natural activist or is that a side effect of being a performer?


EH:  I feel like at first I was talking about my personal experiences and it just opened up conversations.  Once you’ve stared a conversation it’s so much easier to have other conversations. 




AM:  I like your song about Arizona.


EH:  I guess I am a natural activist.  You can’t tell me here is an injustice going on, write a song about it.  It never works like that for me.  It seems trite and forced.  It has to personally piss me off.  I was in Arizona at the time and it pissed me off.


AM:  You recently started performing stand-up comedy.  How did you get interested in that? 


EH:  I have always loved stand-up comedy, in fact, on my long drives when I am touring, it is easier to listen to stand-up comedy albums than music because it feels like someone is talking to you and keeps me more awake and alert. I have done a tiny bit of what you could call stand-up/storytelling in my shows but never without my guitar. That way, if I bombed with a joke, I could play a Journey song and everyone is back on my side, see how I did that?


AM: Is it harder than singing and playing in front of people?


EH:  It is harder than singing and playing, and I wonder if that is because I am new at it, without the guitar, or it is because it is never the same audience.  You could do EXACTLY the same set list for music and get a pretty equivalent reaction. You can do EXACTLY the same comedy set and get a completely different reaction.


AM:  Is there more comedy in your future or even acting?


EH:  I am not sure acting is my thing. I recently acted in a film by Steve Balderson, "Occupying Ed" that I love, and it was a lot of work for me to be somebody else. I feel stand-up isn't so far from being a songwriter because it is about being myself.  I would LOVE to do more comedy. There is a challenge in writing bits that is different than writing songs. Very therapeutic in both though. Comedy is laughing at yourself, which might be hard for some serious singer/songwriters to do, and I was like that for quite some time.


AM:  Have you always enjoyed cooking?


EH:  I was never too interested in cooking to be honest until I bought my own house and had the time and money to take cooking classes. I was scared to cook for myself and others because I was afraid I would accidentally poison someone, ha. Once I started the classes, my fears dissolved and my creativity showed up in full force. I enjoyed driving recipes to what I thought would be good together. Now, I love to cook and show others just how they can do the same with my online cooking segments, TRIAL AND ERIC.



To learn more about Eric Himan visit his web site http://www.erichiman.com/

Sunday, August 24, 2014

In Bed With Leslie Jordan


All Photos:  Alan Mercer       Lighting& Asst:  Eric V. & Psymon Imagery



Leslie Jordan is currently in England filming 'Celebrity Big Brother UK' until September 15, but I was able to meet up with him before he left.  We had our photo session and conversation in the Mary Kay Suite at the Anatole Hotel in Dallas, Texas.  


For such a diminutive frame, Leslie Jordan has a tall propensity for scene-stealing.  He hails from the South, as his dead-giveaway drawl quickly exposes, and was raised in a highly conservative, deeply religious atmosphere in Chattanooga, Tennessee. His father, a Lieutenant Colonel with the Army, was killed in a plane crash when he was only 11. Uncertain about his direction in life, an inescapable talent for high camp, not to mention an impish mug and pocket-sized structure ideal for commercials, must have inspired Leslie enough to risk taking on Hollywood in 1982.


Following training with acting Coach Carolyn Barry, who ran the Professional Artist's Group during the 80s, he became highly marketable in commercial spots. TV would invariably be the next step. In the midst of it all he involved himself deeply in writing. Avid L.A. theatergoers will probably recognize him for such prone-to-misfit characters as Brother Boy, an institutionalized drag queen, in "Sordid Lives," and Peanut, a habitual barfly, in "Southern Baptist Sissies."




His own one-man testimonials, such as the off-Broadway "Hysterical Blindness" and the more recent "My Trip Down The Pink Carpet," show an actor quite adept at baring his soul and exposing his childhood agonies on stage amidst laughter and tears. These shows came at a price, however. A self-proclaimed substance abuser and sexaholic, Jordan spent jail time more than once for DUI before facing his inner demons and reaching full recovery since 1996.


In the end he has reaped the rewards of comedy success. In low budget film projects since 1988, he has been part of such off-the-wall material as 'Frankenstein General Hospital,' 'Black Velvet Pantsuit and Farm Sluts,' to name a few. He has also experienced the joy of seeing one of his own writing projects come to full fruition with the film ‘Lost in the Pershing Point Hotel.’  He was also given the chance to recreate his Big Brother role in ‘Sordid Lives’ to the big screen and on TV.



TV has been an exceptionally inviting medium over the years with a number of fun, flouncy roles coming his way. Noted for his catchy guest work on "Murphy Brown" and "Lois & Clark," among others, he was also a series regular on ‘Reasonable Doubts’  and ‘Hearts Afire.’  Leslie has a wonderfully wicked recurring role as a very small thorn in Megan Mullally's side on the popular ‘Will & Grace’ sitcom. Playing the snide, mincing and unconvincingly homophobic hanger-on Beverley Leslie, the actor plays the hilarity up for all its worth.  At other times his loser types have proved quite touching, if pathetic, in offbeat drama.




AM:  Leslie, it was so exciting when you won an Emmy!  I would think your stock immediately goes up after winning but you tell a different story.


LJ:  I thought I’d been acting for twenty years and I’d won an Emmy so I was going to sit back and let it come to me….well, we’re waiting and waiting.


AM:  Was that a surprise?


LJ:  I’ve been around long enough to know the way this business works.  My manager does remind me that since the day I won the Emmy in 2006 I’ve never had to audition once.  Now that is something for an actor like me, who is either really right for the part or I’m not right at all.  There’s no in between. 


AM:  You also got sober a few years ago.  That must help.


LJ:  I got sober seventeen years ago and learned to live in the moment.


AM:  What changed in your life perspective?


LJ:  I used to dream about the future and think when I get that series, or meet that perfect person or get a house in the Hollywood Hills and it’s not like that at all.  Life is a journey.  I love the Jim Carrey quote, “I wish everyone could get rich and famous so they would understand it’s not the answer.”




AM:  But once upon a time you thought it was the answer didn’t you?


LJ: Oh absolutely!  I got off the bus and that’s all I wanted for twenty years, but then I realized that unless I had a spiritual side it was all worthless.  I respect Madonna because she had everything including a home in England and she studied the Kabbalah.  All the success becomes meaningless unless you are happy from the inside.


AM:  How do you find your spiritual nurturing?


LJ:  Through a recovery program.  I still go to meetings after seventeen years.  I grew up in a very religious family.


AM:  Your family would go to church regularly didn't you?


LJ:  Our community was the church.  Everything was church.  If you went to a New Year’s Eve party it was at the church.  It’s all church, church, church.  When I got to West Hollywood, which is my community now, I still never felt like I had a real sense of community.  I need a group of people that will call me out on all my attitudes.  I need people who can look at me and say, “That’s bullshit Leslie.”


AM:  Do you feel more fully realized at this point in your life?


LJ:  I’m at the point where I am closer to my authentic self than I have ever been.    I’m happier with who I am and what I am, which was such a struggle because of my religious upbringing.


AM: Have you had any other challenges or struggles?


LJ:  I’ve also had to reinvent myself.  When you first met me I was just starting to head out on the road.  I didn’t know there was money to be made outside of LA.  My management gets me lots of out of town gigs now.  I travel all the time.  I’m booked solid most of the year. 




AM:  Most of your fans know you as Brother Boy from ‘Sordid Lives.’  You are one and the same.  How did that all start?


LJ:  I told my friend Del Shores that he could write short stories so he wrote a short story called, ‘The Dehomosexualization of Brother Boy’ and I read it and thought it was so funny.  Then he wrote one called ‘Nicotine Fit’ about three sisters in the living room fighting over burying their mother in a mink stole.  Then he wrote another one about a woman who gets high on valium and holds her husband hostage.  Then he called me and told me he was putting them all together into a play.  At first I told him it was a mess and he couldn’t have all that going on.


AM:  You told that to Del!?!  Obviously that became 'Sordid Lives.'


LJ:  Thank God he didn’t listen to me!  So he added the funeral scene at the end and that tied it all up. 


AM:  What are you proud of?


LJ:  Buying my mother a condominium is the best thing I’ve ever done as an adult.  I also bought my twin sisters a condominium next to my mother so they can take care of her.  I have a huge ship afloat. 


AM:  Leslie, I have seen every show you have ever done and I end up hurting from laughter.  You are a genius.


LJ:  Thank you!  I love performing on stage but I would also love to stay home.  



To learn more about Leslie Jordan visit his facebook page https://www.facebook.com/thelesliejordan